What are Pocket Poems?

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Part of my responsibilities co-chairing the Poetry Celebration is finding poems to include on the Pocket Poem display.  It’s a display in the school library where children can pick out poems to read, put in their pocket and keep.

I selected poems from the following books.

The 20th Century Children’s Poetry Treasury selected by Jack Prelutsky and illustrated by Meilo So – A collection of more than 200 poems by such modern poets as Nikki Grimes, John Ciardi, Karla Kuskin, Ted Hughes, e.e. cummings, Eve Merriam, Deborah Chandra, Arnold Adoff, and more than 100 others.

National Geographic Book of Animal Poetry:  200 Poems with Photographs That Squeak, Soar and Roar! edited by J. Patrick Lewis – Combines photography with lyrical text celebrating the animal world, in a compilation that includes works by such poets as Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost and Rudyard Kipling.

Pocket Poems edited by Bobbi Katz and illustrated by Marilyn Hafner – A collection of short poems by such authors as: Gwendolyn Brooks, Emily Dickinson, Emily George, Nikki Giovanni, Eve Merriam, and Charlotte Pomerantz.

Poems to pick up and put in your pocket.  What a great way to share poetry.

Brush of the Gods – ML wants to meet the author and illustrator

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We’ve received bookmarks, posters and advanced copies from some authors and illustrators.  Also, we’ve met authors and illustrators at our local bookstore.  Apparently, ML thinks I have an in with all authors and illustrators.  Last night after reading Brush of the Gods by Lenore Look and illustrated by Meilo So, ML said, “I love this book.  I want to meet the author and illustrator.”

Lenore Look lives in New Jersey.  Meilo So lives in the Shetland Isles, a subarctic archipelago of Scotland.  If either visits Quail Ridge Books, we will be there.  If someone wants to fund a visit to Scotland, ML and I will be happy to visit Meilo So on her small island.

Brush of the Gods highlights the life of Wu Daozi;  considered a master painter during the T’ang Dynasty in the seventh century.  According to the author’s note, “He introduced the concept of depicting movement in figures and their clothing.  His figures’ scarves billowed, their robes swung, and their hair blew in the wind.”  Meilo So’s illustrations use watercolor, ink, gouache and colored pencils to represent Daozi’s style.

Legend has it Daozi entered an archway painted on the mural he created for the emperor and disappeared forever.  None of his murals survived to present day.  Below is an example of his work.

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