I’m On My Own – Twenty Picture Book Arrivals

Looks like I’m on my own for a bit with picture books.  ML wants us to read chapter books together.  I thought I could sneak a few picture books into our bedtime reading.  It didn’t work, she’s adamant.  We’ve decided to start the first Harry Potter book.

So I’m on my own until I convince her that picture books are great for every age.  In twenty words or less, I’m sharing my favorite part of the following seventeen??? picture books

Little Red's Riding Hood

Little Red’s Riding Hood by Peter Stein and illustrated by Chris Gall – “Why, Granny!  What a big GRILLE you have!”

Yeti and the Bird

Yeti and the Bird by Nadia Shireen – Worm Jam

 

Hoot Owl

Hoot Owl:  Master of Disguise by Sean Taylor and illustrated Jean Jullien – Pay attention to the eyes.

Nobody's Perfect

Nobody’s Perfect by David Elliott and illustrated by Sam Zuppardi – “This is my room before I clean it.  This is my room after I clean it.”

Backwards Birthday

The Backwards Birthday Party by Tom Chapin and John Forster and illustrated by Chuck Groenink – “We blindfolded the donkey, and he pinned the tail on us.”

You Are Not Small

You Are (Not) Small by Anna Kang and illustrated by Christopher Weyant – I loved the big gray-green, hairy monster leg and the parachuting pink monsters.

No, Silly

No, Silly! by Ken Krug – “I like to sleep on cookies.”

Glamourpuss

Glamourpuss by Sarah Weeks and illustrated by David Small – The cat says “ME” and the dog says “WOW.”

Little Puffin's First Flight

Little Puffin’s First Flight by Jonathan London and illustrated by Jon Van Zyle “a puffling will eats as many as 2,000 fish in its first six weeks of life.”

Big Tractor

Big Tractor by Nathan Clement – A unique book about seasons sharing the life of a farmer and various farm equipment used throughout the year.

You Nest Here

You Nest Here With Me by Jane Yolen and Heidi E. Y. Stemple and illustrated by Melissa Sweet – Who knew cowbirds don’t make nests? “the uninvited guest, Leaves her egg in a foster nest”

I Don't Want to Be a Frog

I Don’t Want to Be a Frog by Dev Petty and illustrated by Mike Boldt – “You are a Wet, Slimy, Bug-Eating very luck Frog.”

In

In by Nikki McClure – Don’t miss the Owl Guide at the end of the book.

 

Counting Crows

Counting Crows by Kathi Appelt and illustrated by Rob Dunlavey – Fun words throughout the book. . . by jango, smackers, grackle, yeppers.  Who knew crows could look so delightful?

My Pen

My Pen by Christopher Myers – A book celebrating drawing in creative illustrations and words.  “My pen tap-dances on the sky.”

Nana in the City

Nana in the City by Lauren Castillo – “I felt brave in my cape.”  what a great line.

Room for Bear

Room for Bear by Ciara Gavin – I love Bear’s problem solving and the “Eat Quack Love” sign in his den.

Little Bird Takes a Bath

Little Bird Takes a Bath by Marisabina Russo – I broke out in song throughout the book, “Rain, Rain Go Away” “Row, Row, Row Your Boat” and many other classics.

P.Zonka

P. Zonka Lays an Egg by Julie Paschkis -I love this chicken that marches to a different drummer and lays eggs on her own terms.

If I Had Triceratops

If I had a Triceratops by George O’Connor – The illustrations for “I’d be sure to clean up after her” and the one of her playing fetch.

 

 

Underwear Books

One Big Pair UnderwearUnderpants DanceLazy Daisyfroggy

 

ML is not alone. Most kids love books featuring underwear.  When One Big Pair of Underwear by Laura Gehl and illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld arrived at the library, I remembered my”Underwear Books” post in draft form.  After a post about poop a few weeks ago and Captain Underpants on Monday, it’s only fitting I share the underwear post.  I’m not giving summaries of the books, just a quick reason we love each book.

One Big Pair of Underwear by Laura Gehl and illustrated by Tom Lichentheld – A book about sharing and underwear.  I know.  Sounds gross; but it’s a funny way to talk about sharing with children.  A clever, delightful story which might result in a piggyback ride.  I know what your thinking.  “What does underwear have to do with piggyback rides?” Read the book, it will make perfect sense.

Underpants Dance by Marlena Zapf and illustrated by Lynne Avril – I cannot tell you our favorite part of this book.  It would spoil the ending.  Get it? ENDing?

Lazy Daisy, Cranky Frankie by Mary Ellen Jordan & Andrew Weldon – A chicken dancing in purple underwear.  Need I say more?

Froggy Gets Dressed by Jonathan London and illustrated Frank Remkiewicz –  I consider this the classic underwear book.  ML loved it even before she wore underwear.

 

Slumber Party: My Friend is Crazy

I’m a little upset with my friend.  My “go to” excuse for not having a slumber party with over three kids at our was our house is too small.  Not going to work now.  My friend’s place is the same size.

The first slumber party I remember attending was at Laura’s house.  Sometime that night, her mom threatened to pop us with a wooden spoon if weren’t quiet.  The next morning we watched Saturday morning cartoons.  If I remember correctly, it was the premiere of the Smurfs, September 12, 1981.  (Thank you Wikipedia for confirming this.) Laura’s birthday was in September; so I’m sure my memory is correct.

Can’t write a post without recommending some books.  Second graders still love being read picture books; and are proud of their ability to read chapter books.  I’ve included both.

What!

What! Cried Granny:  An Almost Bedtime Story by Kate Lum and pictures by Adrian Johnson – This my favorite story to read to kids about a sleepover for two reasons.  One… it’s funny.  Two… it’s at his grandmother’s house.  For many children, spending the night with grandparents is their first sleepover experience.  “When her grandson Patrick arrives for his first sleepover, Granny’s resourceful efforts to provide him with a bed, pillow, and other necessities result in a sleepless night for both of them.”

Froggys Sleepover

Froggy’s Sleepover by Jonathan London and illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz – The story line and illustrations in Froggy books are always funny and a delight to share with a group.  The stuff he packs for the sleepover are quite noisy.  The sleeping bag “sloofs” and the pillow “poofs.”  “Froggy is excited about his first sleepover, but a series of events sends Froggy and Max back and forth between their houses, until it seems they will never fall asleep.”  They finally fall asleep at 9 a.m.  Hoping this isn’t my friend’s reality.

Rabbit Robot

Rabbit & Robot:  The Sleepover by Cece Bell – Rabbit is looking forward to Robot coming over for a sleepover.  He’s written out a plan for the evening.  1. Make pizza.  2. Watch TV.  3. Play Go Fish.  4. Go go bed.  However, things do not go as planned.  A clever story deserving of the Theodor Seuss Giesel Honor it received.

Marigold Lake

The Critter Club:  Liz at Marigold Lake by Callie Barkley and illustrated by Marsha Riti – This is a perfect series for the birthday girl and friends.  They are animal crazy!  The Critter Club is made up of “Four best friends who band together to form a rescue shelter to save lost and lonely animals in their town. Amy, Ellie, Liz, and Marion each have different personalities and interests, but they all have one thing in common: a serious love of animals.” In book seven, “Liz is excited her three best friends are visiting her family’s cabin at Marigold Lake, but something seems to go wrong with every activity she plans.”

Sleepover

I can’t forget to mention Sleepover With Beatrice and Bear by Monica Carnesi.  I featured it a few posts ago.  Another great sleepover picture book.

 

Books for a Frigid Day

SnowmenNightStrangerWoodsJackFrostfroggySnowyDay

The low temperature forecast for today… nine degrees.  Much to our dismay, no snow.  We haven’t had any since we moved into our new house on a street with a perfect sledding hill.  School is on a two hour delay.  They’re probably scared the buses won’t start for those early morning routes.  So our books tonight will follow warm mugs of hot chocolate.

Here are some of ML’s favorite winter books.

Snowman at Night by Caralyn Buehner and illustrated by Mark Buehner – There are many books about snowman, but no snowmen have more fun than the ones in this book.  Snowball fights, snow angels and races each night.  The hidden figures in the shadows and snow add excitement to this lively book.

Stranger in the Woods by Carl R. Sams II and Jean Stoick – There are very few books with photographs that end up in the picture book section of the library.  Luckily, this one did.  A stranger is discovered by the animals in the snowy woods.  While they are discussing which animal should approach it, the brave little chickadee takes it upon herself to fly over and check out the stranger.  It is a snowman with a treat of birdseed on his hat.  The other animals approach and find their own treats… corn, carrots, nuts and acorns.  There are two-legged strangers hiding in the woods watching the animals eat the goodies.

Here Comes Jack Frost by Kazuno Kohara – An original take on winter.  Most books are about snow.  This book focusing on Jack Frost includes simple, yet beautiful illustrations.  Most of the pages include white illustrations with a royal blue background and a few blue details.  At our house, we experience Jack Frost more often than snow.  He particularly loves the car windshield on days we are running a little bit behind.

Froggy Gets Dressed by Jonathan London – I don’t let a winter go by without reading ML this book.  It’s meant to be read aloud, especially the words FROGGY and UNDERWEAR.  She finds it hilarious every year.

And of course the all time classic snow book

The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats – It’s been popular for 50 plus years.  Many say it broke the color barrier in children’s literature.  The great thing about the story is the story itself has nothing to do with race.  Instead, it’s the adventure of a child after snowfall.  I love Al Roker’s quote on the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation’s website, “I remember reading this book to my baby sister thinking, ‘Here’s a kid who looks like me.’ On so many levels, this is such a groundbreaking piece of literature and artwork.”  As NPR’s piece “As Demographics Shift, Kids’ Books Stay Stubbornly White” proves we still have a long way to go.