BRRRR! – 77 Degrees on Christmas Eve

In the spirit of Christmas, I wore a green dress to the Christmas Eve service.  Finding something appropriate for both the weather and holiday was difficult until I remembered the sleeveless dress I purchased last spring.  When the high temperature in Burlington, Vermont is 68 degrees, you can imagine the high in the more southern city of Raleigh, North Carolina — a balmy 77 degrees.  Then, there’s Boston… 69, New York City… 72, Norfolk, VA…82, Naples, FL… 89!

Missing the normal holiday temperatures?  Turn on the air conditioning, put on your fuzzy jammies, warm socks and snuggle with your family while reading these snowy books.

 

Toys Meet Snow
Toys Meet Snow by Emily Jenkins and Paul O. Zelinsky

Little Red Gliding
Little Red Gliding Hood by Tara Lazar and illustrated by Troy Cummings

First Snow
First Snow by Peter McCarty

Bear and Hare
Bear & Hare: Snow! by Emily Gravett

Virgil and Owen
Virgil & Owen by Paulette Bogan

Snowman's Story
Snowman’s Story by Will Hillenbrand

Bear Report
The Bear Report by Thyra Heder

Snow
Snow by Sam Usher

Max and Marla
Max and Marla by Alexandra Boiger

Lost Found
Lost. Found. by Marsha Diane Arnold and illustrated by Matthew Cordell

Penguins Adventure
Penguins Big Adventure by Salina Yoon

Snowy Bear
Snowy Bear by Tony Mitton and illustrated by Alison Brown

Dear Yeti
Dear Yeti by James Kwan

 

Julia’s Review: The Imaginary by A. F. Harrold

The Imaginary

Julia is on fire.  I have five reviews ready to go from her.  I’m feeling confident you’ll see recommendations from her once a week this summer.  Check out what she thought about  The Imaginary by A.F. Harrold and illustrated by Emily Gravett.

Three Words:  exciting, funny, interesting

Favorite Character:  Fridge. I loved how loyal he was to Lizzie.

Least Favorite Character:  I was scared by Mr. Bunting and his imaginary.

Favorite Part:  When Amanda got better and said she’d never forget Rudger, and Fridge and Lizzie were reunited.

Book synopsis from Bloomsbury “Rudger is Amanda Shuffleup’s imaginary friend. Nobody else can see Rudger-until the evil Mr. Bunting arrives at Amanda’s door. Mr. Bunting hunts imaginaries. Rumor has it that he even eats them. And now he’s found Rudger

Soon Rudger is alone, and running for his imaginary life. He needs to find Amanda before Mr. Bunting catches him-and before Amanda forgets him and he fades away to nothing. But how can an unreal boy stand alone in the real world?”

 

8 Great New Picture Books

The Noro virus took over our life a few weeks ago.  Luckily, I request all picture books my library system buys.  I wasn’t at work to peruse the new books when they arrived at the library; but they were waiting on me when I returned.  I haven’t shared the books with ML yet.  She’s hanging out with her dad for spring break.  Friday night, we’ll have a picture book marathon.

 

OliversTree

Oliver’s Tree by Kit Chase – As a tree climber, ML will love this book.  My coworker said, “Something about this book makes me think of Winnie the Pooh.”  It’s true.   The illustrations remind me of  E. H. Shepard’s gentle illustrations in the Pooh books by A. A. Milne.

MatilidasCat

Matilda’s Cat by Emily Gravett – This book has the funniest facial expressions I’ve ever seen on a cat.  ML is going to laugh through the entire book, especially the page where the cat is served a banana at Matilda’s tea party.  I’m bringing home Dogs by Emily Gravett too.  Then, ML can truly appreciate all the humor in this book.

Where'sMommy

Where’s Mommy? by Beverly Donofrio and illustrated by Barbara McClintock -A companion to a book ML enjoyed…  Mary and The Mouse, The Mouse and Mary.  The detailed illustrations comparing the little girl’s day to the little mouse’s day enchant.  ML will love the creative use of everyday things the mice use to furnish their home.  This is a book I’d love to receive for Mother’s Day.

 

GoodPie

The Good-Pie Party by Liz Garton Scanlon and illustrated by Kady MacDonald Denton  – Moving is hard.  No-one likes to say good-bye.  Thankfully, our move was only 3 miles.  ML doesn’t go to school with her friends from our old neighborhood, but we haven’t lost touch.  They are a part of her book club.  The water-color illustrations remind me of our wonderful neighbors from ML’s first five years.  On a very hard day in my life, they joined me for a “When Life Throws You Lemons – Make Lemonade And Lemon Pie Party.”  Pie makes everything easier.

TapTapBoomBoom

Tap Tap Boom Boom by Elizabeth Bluemle and illustrated by G. Brian Karas –  This book shows the beginning of the storm, the mad dash for the subway and the emergence from below to a rainbow in the sky.  Had it arrived earlier this spring, it would have made the Onomatopoeia Part 2 post.   G. Brian Karas uses collages of photographs, gouache and pencils seamlessly integrating the feel of a subway station and the playfulness of the story.

GiftforMama

A Gift for Mama  by Linda Ravin Lodding and illustrated by Alison Jay – A lovely story set in Vienna, Austria showing those who give receive what they need.  The crackled illustrations provide an old-world feel to this book set in 1894.

WindBlew

When the Wind Blew by Alison Jackson and illustrated by Doris Barrette – This book arrived days after my Nursery Rhymes post.  The whimsical, upside-down, fly-about illustrations complement the story.

Splat

Splat! Starring the Vole Brothers by Roslyn Schwartz – A story filled with one syllable words and sounds.  There’s a Flap, Flap, Flap before the Splat!  Guess what happens?  All children will laugh at this scatalogical tale.  The banana peel at the end adds a twist.

Most libraries have a feature allowing you to request books.  This allows you to get on a list for books when they are checked out.  If they are checked in at another location in your library system, you can have it sent to the branch you frequent.  It keeps you from driving all over.