The Solar Eclipse Is Over – Time to Read

A few weeks ago, I started reading The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon.  I was captivated by it; but was busy preparing for an interview.  Then, what I will refer to as The Solar Eclipse of 17 frenzy started.  It will live in infamy with librarians throughout the country.  After answering calls and in person questions about eclipse glasses all day, the last thing I wanted to do when I got home was read a book with sun in the title.  Actually, the last thing I wanted to do at all was read.

Now that the eclipse is over, the world hasn’t ended and my book holding arm wasn’t injured passing out eclipse glasses at our program, I can start reading again.

All this sun and moon conversation reminded me I’ve yet to read the 2017 Newbery Award winner, The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill.  Once I finish The Sun is Also a Star, I’ll start The Girl Who Drank the Moon.

 

 

Rain Wizard by Larry Dane Brimner

I need to connect with the dead tonight.   Charles Mallory Hatfield, to be exact.  I read a fascinating biography about him a year or so ago.  It was titled The Rain Wizard by Larry Dane Brimner. The book jacket description said, “Renowned nonfiction writer and longtime Sand Diego resident, Larry Dane Brimner delves deep into the life of the man who carried his rainmaking secrets to the grave.  Was this man of mystery a scientist as he claimed or simply a fraud playing on people’s desperation?”

For weeks, I’ve been trying to figure out how to make it rain on August, 21, 2017.  Six weeks ago, I didn’t even know there was going to be a solar eclipse.  One week ago, I started having nightmares about it.  I dug myself in a hole without knowing what I was getting into.  Around six weeks ago, it was mentioned my library system might order solar eclipse glasses for a program.  If they did, how many would our location need?  Based on previous program attendance, I sent in a number and didn’t think anything more about it.  Until a few weeks ago.  The PR arrived and I put it up in the library.  I did not set up registration for the event because the number of glasses we ordered were plenty for the number of families that usually attend our special programs.  Then, an evil person provided the media with fake news.  (Sorry my anxiety took over the keyboard for a sentence.) I don’t think it was a conspiracy just poorly written headlines.

Here’s an example from one news source.

Need Solar Eclipse Glasses?  They’re Free at Libraries Across America

weather.com/science/news/free-eclipse-glasses-available-at-libraries-across-america

Most people probably only read the headline.  Knee deep in the article was important information.  “The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning and STAR_Net Libraries have teamed up to provide more than 2 million solar-viewing glasses at 4,800 public library locations across the nation, partially funded through the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.”

Across the nation, library phones started ringing off the hook.  From the beginning, we told people we weren’t doing registration.  We’ve never needed to do registration in the past at my location.  It would be first come first serve, one pair of glasses per family.  Then, the phone kept ringing.  We realized we needed to order more.  We did.  I even ordered a pack of ten for my daughter planning to donate the rest to the library.  With the extra order and mine, we would have more than enough.  Then, I received the Amazon email informing me they were recalling the glasses I ordered.  Seeing that we ordered the extra glasses for the library from Amazon, this did not bode well.  That afternoon, my manager received the illustrious Amazon email.

Librarians across the nation have been having online group therapy… sharing their experiences and ideas.  Here are some of my favorites.

needed: brilliant ideas for keeping eclipse glasses seekers as lifelong patrons
My Favorite Answer:  Winter Solstice Glowstick Party?

*ring ring*
*Coworker picks up*
“Sarah, it’s your mom”
“Omg, she never calls me at work, I hope everything is ok!”
*I pick up*
“Hi Mom, is everything alright?”
“Hi honey, I heard libraries have free eclipse glasses…”
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO…. E TU BRUTE???

so … what happens to all these eclipse glasses on tuesday?
My Favorite Answer:  I heard on the radio that libraries are glad to accept them as donations (along with the M – Mil volume of a 1986 encyclopedia set)!

And most importantly – What’s the best way to hand out glasses?
My Favorite Answer:  Make it like an Easter Egg Hunt

I’ve let every person working Monday know they are welcome to send all unhappy people to me.  I’ve lived long enough to know that admitting your mistakes is usually the best way to handle difficult situations.  I just need to remind myself throughout the event that this too will pass.  If that doesn’t work, there’s always bourbon.  I’ll be too busy with crowd control to see the eclipse.  Luckily, someone has a bottle of bourbon on hand for me to have a post eclipse drink or four.

As for me, I learned a lesson.  Our Slime Fest in September is a Registration Required event.

 

 

Catching Up on Picture Book Reading

June and July at the library is comparable to retail’s November and December.  Things are calming down so I’m catching up on my picture book reading.  Last Friday, I read around ten new picture books I’ve missed when they arrived at the library this year.  My favorites are below.

ML is starting fifth grade.  I’m no longer invited to be a guest reader; and if I was she wouldn’t let me do it.  I need to find a kindergartner or first grader to adopt so I can read these books to a group that’s old enough to enjoy the humor; but not too old to turn their nose up at picture books.

Moo Moo in a Tutu by Tim Miller

Samson The Piranha Who Went to Dinner by Tadgh Bentley

Girlology: There’s Something New About You

 

Recently I read an email from a librarian to a teen librarian group.  It reminded me I had a draft in the works about the book, Girlology:  There’s Something New About You by Dr. Melisa Holmes and Dr. Trish Hutchison.

Hi all,

Anyone have recommendations for good, recent (published within the last year or so) books for tweens about puberty?

Thanks,

Ivy

My response:

My daughter’s pediatrician recommended Girlology:  There’s Something New About You.  It’s the best I’ve ever seen.  It’s written by two ob/gyns who have daughters and were disappointed with the resources available when their daughters were entering puberty.  Check out their website.  It has fantastic information.  www.girlology.com

At ML’s third grade physical, I asked her pediatrician about resources to share with ML about puberty.  I’ve seen what’s out there and it seemed to say too much or too little.  I’m pleased with the book Dr. Shaw recommended.  After reading it, I found myself wishing it had been around when I was near puberty.  It’s much better than that film shown after school in the cafeteria for moms and daughters to watch if they wanted around 4th grade.  I wish I could remember the the title.  I’d love to see it again.  I remember being horrified by it.  Driving home in the red station wagon with the fake wood paneling my mom asked, “Do you have any questions?”  I shook my head very fast.  I’m sure the look on my face was a grimace.  Anybody else have the Mother/Daughter film in the cafeteria after school experience?

To respect ML’s privacy, I won’t share details about her reaction.  I will say it’s a great book for moms to read themselves.  It reminded me of my anxiety at this age about body changes, emotions and friendships.   I asked her dad to read it and encourage you to do the same.

My pediatrician has two daughters a little older than ML.  She explained she gave it to each of her daughters the summer before fourth grade.  The older daughter went straight to her room and read it straight through that afternoon.  When her mom asked if she had any questions she said, “No.”  The younger daughter took it and put it in her room.  Then went back to whatever she was doing.  A few months later, she came to her mom with questions.  She said the reactions didn’t surprise her.  Each one fit their personality.

 

Next summer I’ll buy a copy of A Girls Guide to Stuff That Matters.

And the summer before high school, I’ll buy Hang-Ups, Hook-Ups and Holding Out.  Although, it may have a different title by then.  When you peruse the website, you will see these doctors stay up to date on what’s happening with middle and high schoolers.

For all my friends with sons, don’t fret.  There is also a book called Guyology.  If it’s anything like Girlology, it’s excellent.

 

The Green Umbrella

The Green Umbrella by Jackie Azua Kramer and illustrated by Maral Sassouni is perfect for this rainy day.  I’ll understand if you don’t run straight to the library to get it today.  However, you should request it immediately; so its waiting on a shelf to be picked up the next sunny day.

This book celebrates creativity; and the illustrations are delightful.

 

 

Basketball Belles: How Two Teams and One Scrappy Player Put Women’s Hoops on the Map

Have you filled out your March Madness bracket yet?  I’m not asking about the men’s bracket.  That’s a no brainer.  It’s going to be a UNC Tarheels – Duke Blue Devils matchup in Phoenix.  It’s the WOMEN’S BRACKET you need to fill out and follow.  Our sons and daughters need to understand women play basketball too.  Their games are awesome, exciting and affordable.  Tickets for women’s basketball  are manageable, even on a librarian’s salary.  Men’s basketball tickets, not so much.  I know because I organized a mother/daughter excursion to watch the UNC – NC State Women’s basketball game.  There were twenty-three of us.  Half UNC fans.  Half NC State fans.  All the mom’s agreed we should make it a yearly tradition.

Basketball Belles:  How Two Teams and One Scrappy Player Put Women’s Hoops on the Map by Sue Macy and illustrated by Matt Collins chronicles the first women’s intercollegiate basketball game in 1896.  Stanford and Berkeley played at a neutral site.  In celebration of this historic event, I’ve picked Stanford and Berkeley to be the last teams standing in the 2017 NCAA Women’s Basketball Championship Game.  Stanford will win the game as they did in 1896.  Rules and uniforms have changed these past 121 years.  The thrill of watching scrappy women fight it out is the same.

As most things in history, opportunities for men developed sooner than women.  The Olympics hosted the first men’s game in 1936.  Forty years later, women were given the opportunity to play at the Olympics.  In 1946, the first NBA game was played.  It wasn’t until 1997 the WNBA began.  That’s 51 years.  I’m thankful ML is being raised in a time where women have more choices for athletic opportunities.  Playing basketball is not her thing; and that’s ok.  But it’s some of her friends’ favorite activity.  I’m glad they can have Olympic dreams like ML does for gymnastics.

 

Anything But Ordinary Addie: The True Story of Adelaide Herrman Queen of Magic

Anything but Ordinary

Anything But Ordinary:  The True Story of Adelaide Herrmann Queen of Magic by Mara Rockliff and illustrated by Iacopo Bruno is ENCHANTING!  After reading it, I realized I couldn’t name a contemporary female magician.  I did a little web search.  It appears women are still a minority in the magic field.  Do not miss this book.  The story is empowering and the illustrations are captivating.  Next, read the interesting articles linked below.

Why Are There So Few Female Magicians?

Why Are There No Female Magicians?  Maybe Because We BURNED THEM ALL TO DEATH

Adelaide Herrman:  Queen of Magic

Wikipedia:  Adelaide Herrman

Adelaide 2

Adelaide