Nonfiction Book

Girlology: There’s Something New About You

 

Recently I read an email from a librarian to a teen librarian group.  It reminded me I had a draft in the works about the book, Girlology:  There’s Something New About You by Dr. Melisa Holmes and Dr. Trish Hutchison.

Hi all,

Anyone have recommendations for good, recent (published within the last year or so) books for tweens about puberty?

Thanks,

Ivy

My response:

My daughter’s pediatrician recommended Girlology:  There’s Something New About You.  It’s the best I’ve ever seen.  It’s written by two ob/gyns who have daughters and were disappointed with the resources available when their daughters were entering puberty.  Check out their website.  It has fantastic information.  www.girlology.com

At ML’s third grade physical, I asked her pediatrician about resources to share with ML about puberty.  I’ve seen what’s out there and it seemed to say too much or too little.  I’m pleased with the book Dr. Shaw recommended.  After reading it, I found myself wishing it had been around when I was near puberty.  It’s much better than that film shown after school in the cafeteria for moms and daughters to watch if they wanted around 4th grade.  I wish I could remember the the title.  I’d love to see it again.  I remember being horrified by it.  Driving home in the red station wagon with the fake wood paneling my mom asked, “Do you have any questions?”  I shook my head very fast.  I’m sure the look on my face was a grimace.  Anybody else have the Mother/Daughter film in the cafeteria after school experience?

To respect ML’s privacy, I won’t share details about her reaction.  I will say it’s a great book for moms to read themselves.  It reminded me of my anxiety at this age about body changes, emotions and friendships.   I asked her dad to read it and encourage you to do the same.

My pediatrician has two daughters a little older than ML.  She explained she gave it to each of her daughters the summer before fourth grade.  The older daughter went straight to her room and read it straight through that afternoon.  When her mom asked if she had any questions she said, “No.”  The younger daughter took it and put it in her room.  Then went back to whatever she was doing.  A few months later, she came to her mom with questions.  She said the reactions didn’t surprise her.  Each one fit their personality.

 

Next summer I’ll buy a copy of A Girls Guide to Stuff That Matters.

And the summer before high school, I’ll buy Hang-Ups, Hook-Ups and Holding Out.  Although, it may have a different title by then.  When you peruse the website, you will see these doctors stay up to date on what’s happening with middle and high schoolers.

For all my friends with sons, don’t fret.  There is also a book called Guyology.  If it’s anything like Girlology, it’s excellent.

 

Basketball Belles: How Two Teams and One Scrappy Player Put Women’s Hoops on the Map

Have you filled out your March Madness bracket yet?  I’m not asking about the men’s bracket.  That’s a no brainer.  It’s going to be a UNC Tarheels – Duke Blue Devils matchup in Phoenix.  It’s the WOMEN’S BRACKET you need to fill out and follow.  Our sons and daughters need to understand women play basketball too.  Their games are awesome, exciting and affordable.  Tickets for women’s basketball  are manageable, even on a librarian’s salary.  Men’s basketball tickets, not so much.  I know because I organized a mother/daughter excursion to watch the UNC – NC State Women’s basketball game.  There were twenty-three of us.  Half UNC fans.  Half NC State fans.  All the mom’s agreed we should make it a yearly tradition.

Basketball Belles:  How Two Teams and One Scrappy Player Put Women’s Hoops on the Map by Sue Macy and illustrated by Matt Collins chronicles the first women’s intercollegiate basketball game in 1896.  Stanford and Berkeley played at a neutral site.  In celebration of this historic event, I’ve picked Stanford and Berkeley to be the last teams standing in the 2017 NCAA Women’s Basketball Championship Game.  Stanford will win the game as they did in 1896.  Rules and uniforms have changed these past 121 years.  The thrill of watching scrappy women fight it out is the same.

As most things in history, opportunities for men developed sooner than women.  The Olympics hosted the first men’s game in 1936.  Forty years later, women were given the opportunity to play at the Olympics.  In 1946, the first NBA game was played.  It wasn’t until 1997 the WNBA began.  That’s 51 years.  I’m thankful ML is being raised in a time where women have more choices for athletic opportunities.  Playing basketball is not her thing; and that’s ok.  But it’s some of her friends’ favorite activity.  I’m glad they can have Olympic dreams like ML does for gymnastics.

 

Anything But Ordinary Addie: The True Story of Adelaide Herrman Queen of Magic

Anything but Ordinary

Anything But Ordinary:  The True Story of Adelaide Herrmann Queen of Magic by Mara Rockliff and illustrated by Iacopo Bruno is ENCHANTING!  After reading it, I realized I couldn’t name a contemporary female magician.  I did a little web search.  It appears women are still a minority in the magic field.  Do not miss this book.  The story is empowering and the illustrations are captivating.  Next, read the interesting articles linked below.

Why Are There So Few Female Magicians?

Why Are There No Female Magicians?  Maybe Because We BURNED THEM ALL TO DEATH

Adelaide Herrman:  Queen of Magic

Wikipedia:  Adelaide Herrman

Adelaide 2

Adelaide

 

The Youngest Marcher: The Story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, a Young Civil Rights Activitist

I’m back to writing about books for children.  I’ll devote the rest of this month to books about Amazing Women and Girls.

I’m embarrassed to say I’d never heard of the 1963 Birmingham Children’s March until I read The Youngest Marcher by Cynthia Levinson and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley Newton.  Or if I did, I don’t remember it.  Which is worse than not knowing about it at all.  But I know now and plan to share this book with ML tonight.

The children of Birmingham in 1963 were strong, amazing children.  I can’t imagine agreeing to march, when I was in elementary school, knowing I would probably end up in jail.  Audrey was one of over 3000 brave children who marched.  Thank you Cynthia Levinson and Vanessa Brantley Newton for bringing this story to today’s children and ignorant adults like me.

The next book I plan to read is by Cynthia Levinson.  It provides more details about the march.

Hamilton is All the Rage

Duel

Last October a book titled Aaron and Alexander:  The Most Famous Duel in American History written and illustrated by Don Brown arrived in the library just in time for me to take it to Georgia for Thanksgiving.  I’ve known about this duel far longer than most.  As a child, we would sometimes drive by the jail where Aaron Burr was jailed in Warthen, GA. (pronounced Wur-then) on the way to my grandparents.  My grandfather’s name was Warthen.  My mother lived in Warthen when she was a child.  Add in a history buff of a brother and you can see why I’ve know about the duel for so long.

The Friday after Thanksgiving, my brother’s family, ML and I packed up the car and headed toward Tennille, GA.  Along the way, I read Aaron and Alexander:  The Most Famous Duel in American History to ML, my niece and nephew.

We stopped at our favorite roadside barbecue restaurant.  It serves the same barbecue and brunswwick stew, I’ve loved for 40 years.  The building hasn’t changed either.  There’s still sawdust on the floor.  And the brunswick stew is the best in the world.  Before September 11th, I was known to carry a quart of it on the airplane from Atlanta to Raleigh.

After filling up on barbecue, we stopped at the jail in Warthen.  I have a mug shot to prove it.

We arrived in Georgia last weekend to the cd of Hamilton on full blast in my brother’s car.  Seeing that his US History paper in high school was titled “Hamiltonism vs Jeffersoniasm,” I was not surprised.  What did surprise me is how much ML loved it; even with my brother stopping the music every five seconds to give us a history lesson.  She demanded I order a copy for us; not that I hadn’t already planned to get one as soon as we arrived home.

For the past two weekends, we’ve been jamming to Hamilton with three people who most deserve front row tickets to Hamilton.  Last weekend, my brother.  This weekend, our friend and her son.  All were experts on Hamilton before Hamilton was cool.  My friend refers to Hamilton as her “historical boyfriend.”  There’s nothing like driving your child to camp with three kids in the back singing Hamilton at the top of their lungs.

I confess. I’ve been playing it full blast on my way to work this week.  It’s left me in a historical frame of mind.  Expect to read about more illustrated, nonfiction books about historical times and places in the very new future.

mugshot

ML Reads is Three Years Old!!!

I can’t believe it’s been three years since I started this blog.  I started it on a whim ML’s last month of kindergarten.  This weekend, I realized how very grown up and mature my soon to be fourth grader is.  The blog has evolved these past three years.  I’m certain it will continue to evolve each year.  Expect to see more chapter books and nonfiction books.  Maybe even a young adult book or two.  Don’t worry picture books are my first love; so I’ll continue to share my favorites.  Below are some books with three in their title.  I’ve read two out of three.  Three Times Lucky is on my to read list.  I’m embarrassed I haven’t read it.  It’s a Newbery Honor book by a North Carolina author.

Goldy Luck

Goldy Luck and The Three Pandas by Natasha Yim and illustrated by Grace Zong – One Chinese New Year, Goldy Luck’s mother asks her to take a plate of turnip cakes to the neighbors. The Chans aren’t home, but that doesn’t stop Goldy from trying out their rice porridge, their chairs, and their beds—with disastrous results.

Thre Times Lucky

Three Times Lucky by Sheila Turnage – Rising sixth grader Miss Moses LoBeau lives in the small town of Tupelo Landing, NC, where everyone’s business is fair game and no secret is sacred. She washed ashore in a hurricane eleven years ago, and she’s been making waves ever since. Although Mo hopes someday to find her “upstream mother,” she’s found a home with the Colonel–a café owner with a forgotten past of his own–and Miss Lana, the fabulous café hostess. She will protect those she loves with every bit of her strong will and tough attitude. So when a lawman comes to town asking about a murder, Mo and her best friend, Dale Earnhardt Johnson III, set out to uncover the truth in hopes of saving the only family Mo has ever known.

Breakthrough

Breakthrough:  How Three People Saved Blue Babies and Changed Medicine Forever by Jim Murphy – In 1944 an unprecedented surgical procedure repaired the heart of a child with blue baby syndrome—lack of blood oxygen caused by a congenital defect. This landmark operation opened the way for all types of open heart surgery. The team that developed it included a cardiologist and a surgeon, but most of the actual work was done by Vivien Thomas, an African American lab assistant who was frequently mistaken for a janitor.

 

Renovated Library – First Book Checked Out by ML

Cake

For the past few months, the library I work at has been under renovation.  Our reopening is Saturday.  ML and I are out of town for the big event; so she did a walk through Monday night.  She gave the library two thumbs up.  Then, checked out her first book in the beautiful, new space.  She poured over Piece of Cake! by Dana Meachen Rau all the way home.  After lots of consideration, ML has decided the first cake she would like to make is the Pool Party Cake.  Hard to resist having a blue jello pool.  I’ve checked out three other books by Dana Meachen Rau for ML to fawn over during our 3 hour car trip.  What’s Up, Cupcake?, Smart Cookie, and Eye Candy.

Here’s a picture of my new home away from home.

New Library