Month: July 2015

Julia’s Review: Has Anyone Seen Jessica Jenkins?

Jessica Jenkins

A third review by Julia this week.  Has Anyone Seen Jessica Jenkins? by Liz Kessler

Three words:  funny, exciting, unique
Favorite part: I really liked when Izzy got a super power.
Favorite character:  Izzy because she was most like me- nerdy and a little geeky.
How I felt:  I got excited in this book, especially when they broke in to the house where Max was imprisoned.

Synopsis from Candlewick “Jessica Jenkins has always been a perfectly ordinary girl—until one day part of her arm vanishes in the middle of geography class! Jessica’s friends Izzy and Tom are determined to help her develop her newfound invisibility, though Jessica is more concerned with discovering where the ability came from. When it becomes apparent that there may be other kids developing strange powers of their own, Jessica marshals them into a slapdash band of “slightly superheroes.” But when an unscrupulous adult discovers the origin of their powers and kidnaps one of the team, the rest must put their heads—and all of their skills—together to avert disaster.”

Julia’s Review: Lucky Strike

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Another review by seventh-grade expert, Julia.  Lucky Strike by Bobbie Pyron

Three words:  touching, charming, comfortable (the town felt comfortable, not like the book itself was soft and cozy)
Favorite person: Chum because he was nice to everybody. I sort of pitied him because he was just looking for a friend, but no one wanted to be his friend until Nate and Gen came along.
Favorite part:  When Ruth and Rebecca found the turtle nest.

Synopsis from Arthur Levine Books “Nate Harlow would love to be lucky, just once!

He’d like to win a prize, get picked first, call a coin toss right, even! But his best friend, Genesis Beam (aka Gen), believes in science and logic, and she doesn’t think for one second that there’s such a thing as luck, good or bad. She doesn’t care what names the other kids call them. She cares about being right, about saving the turtles of Paradise Beach, and she cares about Nate.

Then, on his birthday, at the Goofy Golf mini-golf course, Nate is struck by lightning — and survives! Suddenly baseballs are drawn to his bat-popular kids want HIM on their side. It seems the whole town of Paradise Beach thinks Nate has the magic touch.

But is there room for Gen in Nate’s lucky new world?”

Julia’s Review: Paper Things

Paper Things

 

This spring, I posted about Paper Things by Jennifer Richard Jacobson.  Recently, my expert reviewer, Julia wrote the following review.  Julia is a rising seventh grader.

Three words:  heart-wrenching, horribly real, painful (not like it was a bad book, just Ari’s situation was painful)
The book made me feel. . .  sorry for Ari because she had lost so much and was very lost in the world. I was confused by why they had left home.
Favorite character:  Daniel. He was so funny and kind and made Ari feel much better.
Favorite part:  When they organized Crazy Hat Day and got the school traditions back.

Synopsis from Candlewick “When Ari’s mother died four years ago, she had two final wishes: that Ari and her older brother, Gage, would stay together always, and that Ari would go to Carter, the middle school for gifted students. So when nineteen-year-old Gage decides he can no longer live with their bossy guardian, Janna, Ari knows she has to go with him. But it’s been two months, and Gage still hasn’t found them an apartment. He and Ari have been “couch surfing,” staying with Gage’s friend in a tiny apartment, crashing with Gage’s girlfriend and two roommates, and if necessary, sneaking into a juvenile shelter to escape the cold Maine nights. But all of this jumping around makes it hard for Ari to keep up with her schoolwork, never mind her friendships, and getting into Carter starts to seem impossible. Will Ari be forced to break one of her promises to Mama? Told in an open, authentic voice, this nuanced story of hiding in plain sight may have readers thinking about homelessness in a whole new way.”